013: Ep9 – Studying Black Men

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Tommy J. Curry of Texas A&M University.This ninth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast features an interview with Dr. Tommy Curry of Texas A&M University, on the need for black male studies.

Image of the cover of The Man-Not, by Dr. Tommy Curry. Dr. Curry is the author of The Man-Not: Race, Class, Genre, and the Dilemmas of BlackManhood, which will come out in July of 2017 with Temple University Press. Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

(1 hr 15 mins)

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Notes

  1. Dr. Tommy Curry’s new book, The Man-Not: Race, Class, Genre, and the Dilemmas of BlackManhood (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, forthcoming July 2017).
  2. The Society of Young Black Philosophers Facebook group.

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Dr. Tommy Curry proposed the following question in this episode, for which we invite your feedback: “Given the recent election of Trump, how do listeners reconcile the myth of American democratic progress with the regression in American race relations, where deportations, racial profiling, accusations of terrorism, and international bans now become synonymous with American freedom?” What do you think?

Let us know!  Twitter, Facebook, Email, or by commenting here below!

008: Ep4 – Shared Values in the Abortion Debate

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Bertha Manninen of Arizona State University.This fourth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast features an interview with Dr. Bertha Alvarez Manninen of Arizona State University on the topic of shared values in the abortion debate.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

(1 hr 8 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Albert Camus, The Stranger (New York: Vintage Press, 1989).
  2. Plato, Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo (Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing, 2002).

 

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Dr. Manninen proposed the following questions in this episode, for which we invite your feedback: “Would people really want to live in a world where we don’t study the humanities anymore? There seems to be a lot of push to getting rid of ‘useless majors’: ‘We don’t need literature’; ‘We don’t need philosophy’; ‘We don’t need to talk about poetry anymore’; ‘We should just do practical things.’ Do you really want to live in a world where Plato is dead, where Shakespeare is dead, where we don’t think about what it means to be a human being anymore? Why  or why not?” What do you think?

Let us know!  Twitter, Facebook, Email, or by commenting here below!

 

Transcript

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You can download and read the transcript for the show in an Adobe PDF version of it.

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‘What Ifs’ and No Regrets

By Dr. Shane Courtland, Civil American, Volume 1, Article 1 (October 31, 2016), https://goo.gl/IEMKOJ.

You only live once.One often hears the expression “You should live your life without regrets” in the same situations that one hears expressions such as “carpe diem” and “YOLO.” The basic idea is that you should live your life to the fullest. One day, if you are lucky to be living, you will be able to look back on your life. When you do so, you do not want to feel that it was wasted merely because you were too timid and afraid to embrace it. Have courage, these slogans implore – reach the fullest potential of a happy and fulfilling life.

In what follows, I want to articulate a different way to understand this expression.

The logo for this publication series, 'Civil American.'

This understanding is inspired, in part, by a passage in Epictetus’s The Enchiridion. In passage #25, he writes:

Print of Epictetus.“Is anyone preferred before you at an entertainment, or in a compliment, or in being admitted to a consultation? If these things are good, you ought to be glad that he has gotten them; and if they are evil, don’t be grieved that you have not gotten them. And remember that you cannot, without using the same means [which others do] to acquire things not in our own control, expect to be thought worthy of an equal share of them. For how can he who does not frequent the door of any [great] man, does not attend him, does not praise him, have an equal share with him who does? You are unjust, then, and insatiable, if you are unwilling to pay the price for which these things are sold, and would have them for nothing. For how much is lettuce sold? Fifty cents, for instance. If another, then, paying fifty cents, takes the lettuce, and you, not paying it, go without them, don’t imagine that he has gained any advantage over you. For as he has the lettuce, so you have the fifty cents which you did not give. So, in the present case, you have not been invited to such a person’s entertainment, because you have not paid him the price for which a supper is sold. It is sold for praise; it is sold for attendance. Give him then the value, if it is for your advantage. But if you would, at the same time, not pay the one and yet receive the other, you are insatiable, and a blockhead. Have you nothing, then, instead of the supper? Yes, indeed, you have: the not praising him, whom you don’t like to praise; the not bearing with his behavior at coming in.”

The basic idea, as far as I can tell, is that Epictetus is reminding us that everything in life has opportunity costs. In order to get something of value, one always forgoes something. The man who gets to go to the party paid for it by having to sell his praise. Epictetus then tells the reader, “But if you would, at the same time, not pay the one and yet receive the other, you are insatiable, and a blockhead.”

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Introducing Civil American

A digital, peer-reviewed journal run by The Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA).

The logo for 'Civil American,' SOPHIA's online peer-reviewed publication.

The Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA) announces the opening of Civil American, our latest venue for public philosophical engagement, released as a peer-reviewed digital journal on our Web site. Each piece will be released individually, much like a newspaper column, interspersed with SOPHIA’s various other posts. Civil American is a place for SOPHIA members and friends to submit short essays, between 700 and 3,000 words (though shorter and longer will be considered), on topics of importance for living and policy-making, as individuals and communities.

Given our 2015 strategic planning initiative, the mission of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA) is “to use the tools of philosophical inquiry to improve people’s lives and enrich the profession of philosophy through conversation and community building.” In pursuit of that mission, two of our four strategic goals are “to use technology effectively” and to “to engage with the profession on public philosophy and digital humanities.”

To these ends, we open up SOPHIA’s online space as a forum for publicly engaged philosophy, to talk about issues and problems that matter to people both in and beyond the academy. Our emphasis is on accessibility of style and importance of subject matter. Following trends of digital publishing, we will consider the pieces released here to be in a volume gathered by year. All pieces released in 2016 will be considered part of Volume 1.

Cover of an issue of Scientific American.Civil American was envisioned as a general-audience targeted scholarly publication by SOPHIA Trustees Dr. John Shook and Dr. Eric Thomas Weber, who see a need for a philosophical equivalent to the great publication, Scientific American. The United States have an immensely rich intellectual tradition, yet much discourse in the public sphere tends to be sensationalist, rather than civil and philosophical.

We welcome proposals for panels of submissions from groups interested in writing on topics in common. Gathered pieces may also be invited to join together in further advancement of their projects for growth in The Public Philosophy Journal‘s developmental and open peer-review process. Shorter projects can begin here and, if desired, be lengthened and deepened through such collaborations.

Photo of Dr. Shane Courtland.More information about Civil American is forthcoming now that we have selected the new editor for the journal, Dr. Shane Courtland. If you have any questions or proposals for submission to Civil American, you can email the Editor here.

Published Pieces (most recent on top):

2016 SOPHIA Panel Caught the Attention of Oxford U Press

December 5, 2015

Photo of the OUP blog. SOPHIA is excited to have the interest of The Public Philosophy Journal to consider publishing our 2016 panel members’ papers from our event held at the Eastern Division meeting of the American Philosophical Association. In reviewing some details about the panel, we found this link to the OUP blog, which was great to see. As the process progresses for submitting the papers to the PPJ, we will keep you posted.

The panel was titled: “The Obligations of Philosophers.”

PPJlogo

Also, if you haven’t checked out The Public Philosophy Journal, what are you waiting for? Seriously, they’ve got an awesome logo & they are experimenting with tools and processes that may revolutionize the way scholars review work, publish, and engage the wider public.

Photo of the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore, MD.SOPHIA will be hosting a panel at the 2017 Eastern Division meeting of the American Philosophical Association on Thursday, January 5th from 5:15-7:15 p.m. There have been some changes to our original plan. The presenters listed below reflect the updated plan:

Group Session

Topic: “The Value of and Impediments to Studying Philosophy for First Generation College Students”

Chair: George R. Lucas (U.S. Naval War College & Notre Dame University)

Speakers and titles:

Dr. Daniel Brunson.Daniel Brunson (Morgan State University)

“Traditions are Precious Treasures? Pragmatic Reflections on Inculcating a Tradition You Only Recently Joined”

Photo of Dr. Bertha Manninen.Bertha Manninen (Arizona State University)

“Why First Generation Students Stay Away From the Humanities – And How We Can Bring Them Back In.”

Dr. Seth Vannatta.Seth Vannatta (Morgan State University)

“Challenges for First-generation Students Studying Philosophy”

Date: January 5, 2017
Time: 05:15-07:15 p.m.
Event: SOPHIA Panel at the 2017 Eastern Division Meeting of the APA
Topic: "The Value of and Impediments to Studying Philosophy for First Generation College Students"
Sponsor: The American Philosophical Association
302.831.1112
Venue: Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel
410.547.1200
Location: 202 East Pratt Street
Baltimore, MD 21202
USA
Public: Public
More Info: Click here for more information.

If you haven't already, register for membership and JOIN SOPHIA!