054: Ep50 – Transitional Justice

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this fiftieth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Colleen Murphy of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign about her recent book on “Transitional Justice.”

Dr. Colleen Murphy.

Cover of Colleen Murphy's 2018 book, The Conceptual Foundations of Transitional Justice.Colleen’s recent book is titled The Conceptual Foundations of Transitional Justice. This project is an extension of her work from a prior book, A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation. Colleen is a Professor in the College of Law and the Departments of Philosophy and Political Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is also the Director of the Women and Gender in Global Perspectives Program in International Programs and Studies, and Affiliate Faculty of the Beckman Institute. She is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Moral Philosophy.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.


(62 mins)

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Notes

  1. Colleen Murphy, The Conceptual Foundations of Transitional Justice (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2018), available for pre-order.
  2. Colleen Murphy, A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012).

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Colleen posed the following question in this episode:

“What do you think counts as dealing justly with our own past here in the United States (or in your country)?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

058: Ep54 – BC11 – Super Cute PBB Promo

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

This fifty-fourth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is our eleventh “breadcrumb” so far, this time featuring only a humorous radio spot that we recorded for the station, WRFL, to play throughout the week to promote the show. We had a lot of fun making this little promo, which features Weber’s 3-year-old son Sam. If you’d enjoy a chuckle, give this, our shortest breadcrumb, a listen.

Samuel Maxwell Weber, the star in our promo spot for Philosophy Bakes Bread.

While putting together this show takes a tremendous amount of work and some resources, we hope you can tell how much it’s been a labor of love, the Philo- part of Philosophy! If you enjoy this breadcrumb, share it with your friends, be sure you’ve subscribed to the show, and give us a positive rating and review on iTunes or your podcast outlet of choice!

As always, you can reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we may play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

(4 minutes)

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The logo for WRFL Lexington, 88.1 FM.Notes

  1. WRFL, Radio Free Lexington, 88.1 FM: Web site, Facebook page, and Twitter profile.
  2. Kentucky Child Labor Laws.

Let us know what you think via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below!

053: Ep49 – Public Philosophy and Polarization

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this forty-ninth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Matt Yglesias on the subject of “Public Philosophy and Polarization.” Before starting his career as a pundit, writer, and philosophical blogger, Matt majored in Philosophy in his undergraduate studies.

Matt Yglesias.

Matt is a Senior Correspondent and a co-founder of Vox.com, which he started with Ezra Klein and Melissa Bell in 2014. Vox.com is a popular online news publication that offers commentary and explanations about news of the day. Matt’s writings focus on politics and economic policy. He also co-hosts The Weeds podcast twice a week, a show that gets into the weeds of politics and policy. In addition to his writings for Vox, Think Progress, The Atlantic, Talking Points Memo, and The American Prospect, Matt has authored two books, including most recently, The Rent Is Too Damn High, about the policy origins of the middle class housing affordability crisis in America.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

(61 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

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Notes

  1. Vox.com, which Matt co-founded.
  2. Morris Fiorina, The Myth of a Polarized America (New York: Longman, 2010).
  3. Oprah’s recent 60 Minutes episode, featuring discussion from people on the Left and Right, politically, predicting another civil war.
  4. Newsweek on FDR’s internment camps.

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Matt posed the following question in this episode:

“What issues do you think need to be written about and discussed more in the public sphere?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

052: Ep48 – BC10 – How to Read Philosophy? The Answer Might Surprise You

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Nancy A. McHugh.This forty-eighth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is our tenth “breadcrumb” episode so far, this time with Dr. Nancy McHugh, who was our featured guest in Episode 47. For this breadcrumb, Nancy said that she had a funny tidbit about how to read philosophy, and that the answer to the question might surprise us. We had to hear it!

An optical illusion image that makes it seem as though the image shifts and moves as you look at it.

In addition to being chair of the Philosophy department at Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio, Nancy also teaches in the Inside Out Prison Exchange Program, which is some of the background that helps to understand her answer to the question of how to read philosophy. Her most recent book is titled The Limits of Knowledge: Generating Pragmatist Feminist Cases for Situated Knowing (SUNY Press, 2016).

As always, you can reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we may play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 


(12 mins)

 

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

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Notes

  1. Episode 47 of the show, in which Dr. McHugh was our guest for a full-length episode.
  2. The Inside Out Prison Exchange Program.
  3. A YouTube video about punching down dough, yes, really.

Let us know what you think via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below!

051: Ep47 – Philosophy and Social Change

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this forty-seventh episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Nancy McHugh on the topic of “Philosophy and Social Change.” After the “Know Thyself!” segment, we talk about her recent book, The Limits of Knowledge, inspired by her experiences in Vietnam witnessing continuing victims of Agent Orange. Then, in the next segment, we ask her about her experience teaching in prison in the Inside Out Prison Exchange Program.

Dr. Nancy McHugh.

Dr. McHugh is Professor and Chair of the philosophy department at Wittenberg University. Before publishing The Limits of Knowledge in 2015, Nancy released Feminist Philosophies A-Z in 2007. Her teaching in the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program is coordinated with the London Correctional Institute in London, Ohio.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

(1hr 6 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

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Notes

Dr. Joe Margolis.

Dr. Joe Margolis.

  1. Agent Orange,” via the History Channel Web site.
  2. Nancy McHugh, The Limits of Knowledge (Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 2015).
  3. Council on International Educational Exchange.
  4. Inside Out Prison Exchange Program.
  5. Joe Margolis, philosopher at Temple University.

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Nancy posed the following question in this episode:

“What is it that you will not do? Have you reflected upon what line in the sand you will not cross?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

050: Ep46 – Philosophy at Home

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Amy Leask.In this forty-sixth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Amy Leask of Red T Media and Enable Education on the subject of “Philosophy at Home: Re-envisioning Philosophy’s Reach Beyond the Academy.” Red T Media is a publisher and Web and mobile application provider for parents who want to introduce their kids to Philosophy. Among Red T Media’s most successful books is Amy’s Think About It! Series, including their most popular edition called How Do You Know What You Know? The series is subtitled “Philosophy for Kids!”

An image featuring Sophie, the heroine of the Think About It series, put out by Red T Media. Next to Sophie is a robot and the word "Wiseland," related to several of Red T Media's projects.

Amy is an educator, writer, and children’s digital media producer from Milton, Ontario, in Canada. She is the founder of Red T Media, and co-founder of Enable Education. Enable Education is a provider of online educational content, mobile apps, as well as print and audio-visual educational material, in areas including Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, the so-called “STEM” fields from pre-school to post-secondary education. They are also industry leaders, keynote speakers, TEDx Talkers, and “edutech award winners.”

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

(1hr 2 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

 

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NotesCover of Amy Leask's book, "Think About It! How Do You Know What You Know?

  1. Enable Education.
  2. Red T Media.
  3. Amy Leask (author) and Mark Hughes (illustrator), Epistemology: How Do You Know What You Know? (Ontario, Canada: Enable Education, 2014).
  4. Amy Leask (author), Jane Li (illustrator), and Octavian Ciubotariu (photographer), Zoom In, Zoom Out (Ontario, Canada: Enable Education, 2017).
  5. Valerie Straus, “Local Texas GOP rejects ‘critical thinking’ skills. Really.” The Washington Post, July 9, 2012.
  6. In this episode, we mentioned another episode (Ep37), with Nick Caltagiarone, who talked about teaching philosophy in high school. He was the one who mentioned the line, which he attributed to John Searle, about the importance of teaching young people how not to be taken in by nonsense.
  7. Michael Lynch, The Internet of Us: Knowing More and Understanding Less in the Age of Big Data (New York: Liveright, 2016).
  8. Amy references a poem, from a song, by Leonard Cohen, called “Anthem,” which includes the beautiful line: “There is a crack, a crack in everything
    That’s how the light gets in.”

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Amy posed the following questions in this episode:

“Are we entitled to our opinions?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

049: Ep45 – Experimentation in Art and Law

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Brian Butler.In this forty-fifth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Brian Butler of the University of North Carolina Asheville. We talk with Brian about two applications of the idea known as “democratic experimentalism” that have been at the heart of his work. One application concerns Constitutional law. The other involves the history of Black Mountain College, an experiment in democratic experimentalism applied to higher education, where art was central to education in the college.

Sue Spayth (left) and unknown student in front of the Lee Hall, Blue Ridge Campus, 1938.

© Western Regional Archives, States Archives of North Carolina. This and other photos available at Metalocus.

Dr. Butler is the Thomas Howerton Distinguished Professor of Humanities and Professor of Philosophy at the UNC Asheville. He recently published his book, The Democratic Constitution: Experimentalism and Interpretation, with the University of Chicago Press. He was also the Project Director in 2010 for a large grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities’s “We the People” Grant program, which focused on “Black Mountain College: An Artistic and Educational Legacy.” Black Mountain College was founded in 1933 in North Carolina as was an experimental college with a central role for art in liberal arts education. John Dewey’s philosophy of education was a fundamental inspiration for the college.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

(1hr 8 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

 

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Notes

  1. Entry on H. L. A. Hart at Oxford Legal Philosophers.
  2. Ronald Dworkin’s obituary in The New York Times.
  3. Brian Butler, The Democratic Constitution: Experimentalism and Interpretation (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2017).
  4. A brief introduction to the history of Black Mountain College.
  5. Martin Duberman, Black Mountain: An Exploration in Community (Chicago: Northwestern University Press, 2009).
  6. Mary Caroline (M. C.) Richards, a former faculty member at Black Mountain College.
  7. The Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center.
  8. State Archives of North Carolina.
  9. Visit Black Mountain College.

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Dr. Butler posed the following questions in this episode:

“How does democracy relate to evidence? What type of evidence should be allowed in a democracy and what kind of evidence should be excluded?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

048: Ep44 – On Philosophy, Leadership, & SOPHIA

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Cover of Democracy and Leadership, which features a painting of a crowd at a political event. In this forty-fourth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Dr. Anthony Cashio decides that “turn-about is fair play.” He had been the guest in the very first episode of the show, and in this episode, he turns the tables and grills co-host Dr. Eric Thomas Weber as the guest for the day. The show focuses on Weber’s 2013 book, Democracy and Leadership, and then relates Weber’s theory of democratic leadership to his work as Executive Director of the Society of Philosophers in America, a.k.a. SOPHIA.

Dr. Eric Thomas Weber.

Dr. Weber is the author of four books, including most recently Democracy and Leadership(2013) and Uniting Mississippi (2015). In 2015 he was awarded the Mississippi Humanities Council’s Humanities Scholar Award in their Public Humanities Awards program. At the University of Mississippi, he was associate professor of public policy leadership from 2007 to 2016. In 2016, he moved to the University of Kentucky, where he is visiting associate professor in the philosophy department. In 2017, SOPHIA was awarded the major prize from the APA and the Philosophy Documentation Center for excellence and innovation in philosophy programs.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.


(1hr 8 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

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Notes

  1. Weber, Eric Thomas, Democracy and Leadership (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2013).
  2. The Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA), and how to join.
  3. The American Philosophical Association and the Philosophy Documentation Center prize for Excellence and Innovation in Philosophy Programs.

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Dr. Weber posed a question in this episode:

“Do you have spaces and communities in which you can hold deep, philosophical conversations? If you don’t, do you want in?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

047: Ep43 – The Stories of Our Day 1, Game of Thrones

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Photo of Dr. Shane Courtland.This forty-third episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special new show format, more of a round-table discussion than usual, and with a new theme: The Stories of Our Day. In this first “Stories of Our Day” episode, we’re talking about The Game of Thrones! For this discussion, we knew that we wanted to bring Dr. Shane Courtland back on the show, given his specialty in Thomas Hobbes’s somewhat bleak philosophy, which has a lot to tell us about the harshness and quasi-realism (if you focus on human beings rather than the dragons) of Game of Thrones.

The Thinker, sitting on the iron throne, thinking about how philosophy bakes bread in the Game of Thrones.

Dr. Courtland was our guest once before, in Episode 8 of the show, on “Selfish Ethics?” Dr. Courtland is director of the Center for Free Entreprise at Western Virginia University. His recent book is titled Hobbesian Applied Ethics and Public Policy, and was released with Routledge Press in 2017.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

(1hr 9 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

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Notes

  1. They Live [movie] (1988).
  2. Zizek in “The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema” [movie] (2006).
  3. The NeverEnding Story [movie] (1984).
  4. The Dukes of Hazzard [television show] (1979-1985).
  5. Star Trek: The Next Generation [television show] (1987-1994).
  6. Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince (New York: Dover Publications, 1992).
  7. In his You Tell Me! question, Shane mentions Syrio Forel, about whom there’s a wiki page here.

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, we posed a few questions in this episode’s round-table format:

“Is death a major theme in Game of Thrones, and if so, why?”

“Do you think that talking philosophically about Game of Thrones and the Stories of Our Day is frivolous or meaningful? Should we keep making episodes with this new theme?”

“What are the Stories of Your Day, the stories from your youth that were really formative of who you are?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

 

046: Ep42 – BC9 – Overcoming Redneck State Stigma

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Larry A. HickmanThis forty-second episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a second “breadcrumb” episode with Dr. Larry A. Hickman, who was our featured guest in Episode 40. In that episode, Larry spoke about democracy and education in the United States today. While he was with us, we asked him to comment on a question that we received from a listener earlier this year. Larry, Anthony, and Eric each live or have lived in states that are sometimes prejudged and stigmatized for characteristics you might call “redneck,” being significantly rural and agricultural. Jason Fultz had called a few weeks before and asked us to comment on what one can do to overcome stigma for your state. So, we played his question and asked Larry what he thought. Then, we all thought about it and a few answers emerged that may prove helpful for “Overcoming Redneck State Stigma.”

Photo of a man posing in front of a pine-wood wall, wearing a furry hat, and making a silly face.

Photo courtesy of Gratisography (Source: www.gratisography.com), CCO license.

Cover of Eric Thomas Weber's book, Uniting Mississippi.We especially want to thank Jason for calling in and leaving us a great voicemail and question. Of course, we’re grateful to Larry also, who is the former Director of the Center for Dewey Studies at Southern Illinois University and who is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy there. It is worth noting also in particular that Larry brought up progress that the state of Mississippi has made especially given the leadership and example that the University of Mississippi, affectionately called Ole Miss, has offered for the state. He also kindly mentioned Eric’s book on leadership and higher education in Mississippi, Uniting Mississippi: Democracy and Leadership in the South.

As always, you can reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.


(10 mins)

 

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

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Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Photo of a news article in which the headline about a literacy program in Mississippi misspells the state's name as "Missippi."Notes

  1. Episode 40 of Philosophy Bakes Bread, with Dr. Larry A. Hickman. Go listen to it too!
  2. Press Gigem and Bob Taylor, The Best 606 Aggie Jokes (Gigem Press, 1976).
  3. A Wikipedia entry on the adage, “Thank God for Mississippi.”
  4. Larry mentions: Eric Thomas Weber, Uniting Mississippi: Democracy and Leadership in the South (Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2015).

Let us know what you think via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below!