059: Ep55 – Evaluating Public Philosophy

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Eric Thomas Weber.Photo of Dr. Anthony Cashio.In this fifty-fifth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, Anthony and Eric talk about “Evaluating Public Philosophy,” in an episode based upon their recently co-authored paper, titled “Lessons Learned Baking Bread.” In this episode and in our paper, Anthony and Eric propose four criteria by which public philosophy can be evaluated: substance, accessibility, invitingness, and community building.

Judges scoring with numbers raised high.

Anthony and Eric presented this paper in the summer of 2017 at the Future of Philosophical Practice conference at UNC Asheville, in the beautiful hills of Asheville, North Carolina. We are grateful to Brian Butler for hosting a great event there, as well as for all the great feedback that we received at the event. In fact, that is where we met and interviewed Cole Nasrallah, our guest from episode 36, “Quality Philosophy for Everyone.” While we were there, we also interviewed John Shook and Randy Auxier for episode 34, on “Saving American Culture in a Yurt.”

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.


(1 hr 8 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. UPDATE: As of this podcast release, our updated numbers are: 27,500 downloads from 99 countries!
  2. Freeman Dyson, “What Can You Really Know,” The New York Review of Books, November 8, 2012. In that review essay, Dyson asks, “When and why did philosophy lose its bite? How did it become a toothless relic of past glories?”
  3. Our episode with Nancy McHugh, on “Philosophy and Social Change,” episode 47.
  4. Our episode with Amy Leask, on “Philosophy at Home,” episode 46.

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Anthony and Eric posed the following questions in this episode:

“Whom should we have on the show? It doesn’t have to be a philosopher, just someone thoughtful and fun to talk to, from any walk of life.”

“What rewards would be attractive for people who might want to support the show?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

Looking Back on 11 Months of Philosophy Bakes Bread

Logo for Philosophy Bakes Bread, as of June 2017.

Click here to visit PhilosophyBakesBread.com.

SOPHIA released our first episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread in our podcast series on January 19th of 2017. We had a handful of pilot episodes that now-co-host Eric Thomas Weber had made on his own. But in the third week of January, the show launched on the internet for the first time in its present form, with Anthony Cashio serving as our first guest. From then on, Cashio and Weber have to date released and aired 59 episodes on the radio, and 53 in the podcast. As we round the bend and think back on the year, we are also hopeful that this last month leading up to January 19th of 2018 will garner the 2,700 downloads remaining to mark 30,000 for our first year.

View of a sunset through a rear-view mirror.

Copyright Aldertree, CC0 license.

The hope is realistic. The month of November saw 3,500 downloads, and August saw more than 4,500. So, we’re excited. 30,000 seems like a nice round number that also has been mentioned in some of the podcasts that Weber and Cashio listen to regularly, and is considered an important milestone in bigger shows’ growth. Our 59th aired episode was actually our first one recorded entirely while live on the radio in Lexington, at WRFL, 88.1 FM. Anthony had to call in half way through the episode for family reasons. It worked and was a lot of fun. He says that he liked being able to pace as he spoke. That’s not usually an option when you’re in front of a condenser microphone.

In our most recent episode, we took a moment and [spoilers] talked about our most downloaded episodes, as well as which were the favorites for Anthony, Eric, and our returning guest, Dr. Annie Davis Weber. Annie has seen the mountains of work that have gone on behind the scenes to put the show together, edit it, and get it out to you all. Plus, the very first pilot episode of the show (not counting Weber’s roughly recorded speech), Ep0.1, had focused on how philosophy profoundly helped him to be happy despite challenges for the Webers’ daughter, Helen. Given that the episode was recorded so long ago, and was told from Eric’s perspective, Anthony and Eric decided to interview Annie about the matter. She was also helped by philosophical thinking. For Eric, it was stoicism that helped most. For Annie, Buddhist philosophy. We’ll have that episode out in the podcast in a few weeks, but as we round out the year, we thought we’d provide some spoilers about which were our favorite episodes, as well as which have been the most downloaded.

For anyone who hasn’t heard the following episodes, here’s your chance to catch up on them and to help us reach our target milestone of 30,000 downloads by January 19th, 2018. Let’s start with our most downloaded episodes and then we’ll share with you which ones we said were our favorites.

 

Our most downloaded episodes:

 


Dr. Daniel Brunson.#5 of Our Most Downloaded Episodes

Our fifth most downloaded episode featured Drs. Seth Vannatta and Daniel Brunson! The episode was the first part of a two part series:

 

Episode 6: “Part I of II – Teaching Philosophy to First-Generation College Students”

Dr. Seth Vannatta

As of December 20th, 2017, this episode has had 826 downloads. To listen alongside show notes and a transcript, you can click on the link here above, or just listen to it right here:

 

(1hr 5 mins)

(more…)

057: Ep53 – Kneeling and Civil Protest

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Arnold Farr.In this fifty-third episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Arnold Farr about “Kneeling and Civil Protest,” concerning the conflicts that have arisen in the last few months about football star Colin Kaepernick and many others who followed his example.

Embed from Getty Images

Arnold is a professor of philosophy at The University of Kentucky. He authored Critical Theory and Democratic Vision: Herbert Marcuse and Recent Liberation Philosophies. He is currently writing a new book on The New White Supremacy. He is focusing on race and African Philosophy. In addition to these works, Arnold has written numerous articles and book chapters on subjects like German idealism, Marxism, critical theory, and philosophy of race. In addition to his writings, Arnold is the founder of the International Herbert Marcuse Society.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

(1 hr 4 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. John Branch, “The Awakening of Colin Kaepernick,” The New York Times, September 7, 2017.
  2. The Editors of GQ, “Colin Kaepernick Is GQ‘s 2017 Citizen of the Year,” and “Colin Kaepernick Will Not Be Silenced,” GQ, November 13, 2017.
  3. The International Herbert Marcuse Society.

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Arnold posed the following question in this episode:

“What is democracy and how can we achieve it?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

056: Ep 52 – Against the Common Core

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Nicholas Tampio. In this fifty-second episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Nicholas Tampio, author of Common Core: National Education Standards and the Threat to Democracy.

A snippet of the cover for Tampio's book, 'Common Core,' featuring the letters of the title in bubble format, as if each letter were an answer on a multiple choice test.

Nicholas is Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University. In addition to his forthcoming book, he has also authored a book titled Kantian Courage, and another titled Deleuze’s Political Vision. More recently, he has authored a number of essays for popular audiences for such venues as the Huffington Post, Aeon, and CNN.com.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.


(1 hr 5 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Nicholas Tampio, Common Core: National Education Standards and the Threat to Democracy (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018), available for pre-order.
  2. Nicholas Tampio, “In Praise of Dewey,” Aeon, July 28, 2016.
  3. Nicholas Tampio, “Why Common Core Tests Are Bad,” CNN.com, April 24, 2014.
  4. Lindsay Layden, “How Bill Gates Pulled Off the Swift Common Core Revolution,” The Washington Post, June 7, 2014.

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Nicholas posed the following question in this episode:

“Should America have national education standards, and why or why not?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

055: Ep 51 – What Philosophers Owe Society

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this fifty-first episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview UCLA philosophy graduate student and co-founder of the Vim BlogZach Biondi, about “What Philosophers Owe Society,” the subject of a set of essays that he wrote for the Vim.

Zach Biondi.

Zach caught our attention with three essays that he wrote for the Vim Blog, which were released in part in the effort to define what the Vim Blog is all about. According to the site, “The Vim Blog is a collection of philosophers who write and podcast about issues in politics. It is a rethinking of the think piece. The goal is not to write the news but instead to discuss broader trends and the philosophical ideas that are pertinent in the current political climate. The Vim is not embedded in the news cycle. Each article is written to be relevant for a longer term.” Zach’s three essays begin with “What Philosophy Owes Society” here. See also parts II and III

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

(1 hr 6 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. The Vim Blog.
  2. Zach’s first Vim essay, “What Philosophy Owes Society, Part I.”
  3. Zach’s second Vim essay, “Anti-Intellectualism.”
  4. Zach’s third Vim essay, “A New Public Philosophy.”
  5. Michael Sandel, Justice (New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2010).
  6. Michael Sandel, What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets (New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2013).

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Zach posed the following questions in this episode:

“Do you adopt the Socratic attitude — the openness to question any of our beliefs — which Socrates thought was necessary for a life worth living? And, what kinds of political consequences would adopting that attitude have?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

054: Ep50 – Transitional Justice

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this fiftieth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Colleen Murphy of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign about her recent book on “Transitional Justice.”

Dr. Colleen Murphy.

Cover of Colleen Murphy's 2018 book, The Conceptual Foundations of Transitional Justice.Colleen’s recent book is titled The Conceptual Foundations of Transitional Justice. This project is an extension of her work from a prior book, A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation. Colleen is a Professor in the College of Law and the Departments of Philosophy and Political Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is also the Director of the Women and Gender in Global Perspectives Program in International Programs and Studies, and Affiliate Faculty of the Beckman Institute. She is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Moral Philosophy.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.


(62 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Colleen Murphy, The Conceptual Foundations of Transitional Justice (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2018), available for pre-order.
  2. Colleen Murphy, A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012).

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Colleen posed the following question in this episode:

“What do you think counts as dealing justly with our own past here in the United States (or in your country)?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

058: Ep54 – BC11 – Super Cute PBB Promo

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

This fifty-fourth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is our eleventh “breadcrumb” so far, this time featuring only a humorous radio spot that we recorded for the station, WRFL, to play throughout the week to promote the show. We had a lot of fun making this little promo, which features Weber’s 3-year-old son Sam. If you’d enjoy a chuckle, give this, our shortest breadcrumb, a listen.

Samuel Maxwell Weber, the star in our promo spot for Philosophy Bakes Bread.

While putting together this show takes a tremendous amount of work and some resources, we hope you can tell how much it’s been a labor of love, the Philo- part of Philosophy! If you enjoy this breadcrumb, share it with your friends, be sure you’ve subscribed to the show, and give us a positive rating and review on iTunes or your podcast outlet of choice!

As always, you can reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we may play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

(4 minutes)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

 

The logo for WRFL Lexington, 88.1 FM.Notes

  1. WRFL, Radio Free Lexington, 88.1 FM: Web site, Facebook page, and Twitter profile.
  2. Kentucky Child Labor Laws.

Let us know what you think via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below!

053: Ep49 – Public Philosophy and Polarization

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this forty-ninth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Matt Yglesias on the subject of “Public Philosophy and Polarization.” Before starting his career as a pundit, writer, and philosophical blogger, Matt majored in Philosophy in his undergraduate studies.

Matt Yglesias.

Matt is a Senior Correspondent and a co-founder of Vox.com, which he started with Ezra Klein and Melissa Bell in 2014. Vox.com is a popular online news publication that offers commentary and explanations about news of the day. Matt’s writings focus on politics and economic policy. He also co-hosts The Weeds podcast twice a week, a show that gets into the weeds of politics and policy. In addition to his writings for Vox, Think Progress, The Atlantic, Talking Points Memo, and The American Prospect, Matt has authored two books, including most recently, The Rent Is Too Damn High, about the policy origins of the middle class housing affordability crisis in America.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

(61 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Vox.com, which Matt co-founded.
  2. Morris Fiorina, The Myth of a Polarized America (New York: Longman, 2010).
  3. Oprah’s recent 60 Minutes episode, featuring discussion from people on the Left and Right, politically, predicting another civil war.
  4. Newsweek on FDR’s internment camps.

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Matt posed the following question in this episode:

“What issues do you think need to be written about and discussed more in the public sphere?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

052: Ep48 – BC10 – How to Read Philosophy? The Answer Might Surprise You

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Nancy A. McHugh.This forty-eighth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is our tenth “breadcrumb” episode so far, this time with Dr. Nancy McHugh, who was our featured guest in Episode 47. For this breadcrumb, Nancy said that she had a funny tidbit about how to read philosophy, and that the answer to the question might surprise us. We had to hear it!

An optical illusion image that makes it seem as though the image shifts and moves as you look at it.

In addition to being chair of the Philosophy department at Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio, Nancy also teaches in the Inside Out Prison Exchange Program, which is some of the background that helps to understand her answer to the question of how to read philosophy. Her most recent book is titled The Limits of Knowledge: Generating Pragmatist Feminist Cases for Situated Knowing (SUNY Press, 2016).

As always, you can reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we may play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 


(12 mins)

 

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Episode 47 of the show, in which Dr. McHugh was our guest for a full-length episode.
  2. The Inside Out Prison Exchange Program.
  3. A YouTube video about punching down dough, yes, really.

Let us know what you think via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below!

 

Transcript

(more…)

051: Ep47 – Philosophy and Social Change

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this forty-seventh episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, we interview Dr. Nancy McHugh on the topic of “Philosophy and Social Change.” After the “Know Thyself!” segment, we talk about her recent book, The Limits of Knowledge, inspired by her experiences in Vietnam witnessing continuing victims of Agent Orange. Then, in the next segment, we ask her about her experience teaching in prison in the Inside Out Prison Exchange Program.

Dr. Nancy McHugh.

Dr. McHugh is Professor and Chair of the philosophy department at Wittenberg University. Before publishing The Limits of Knowledge in 2015, Nancy released Feminist Philosophies A-Z in 2007. Her teaching in the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program is coordinated with the London Correctional Institute in London, Ohio.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

(1hr 6 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

Dr. Joe Margolis.

Dr. Joe Margolis.

  1. Agent Orange,” via the History Channel Web site.
  2. Nancy McHugh, The Limits of Knowledge (Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 2015).
  3. Council on International Educational Exchange.
  4. Inside Out Prison Exchange Program.
  5. Joe Margolis, philosopher at Temple University.

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Nancy posed the following question in this episode:

“What is it that you will not do? Have you reflected upon what line in the sand you will not cross?”

Let us know what you think! Via TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.