034: Ep30 – Private Government

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Elizabeth AndersonIn this thirtieth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Elizabeth Anderson about her new book, Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don’t Talk About It). She recently published a piece on the book on Vox.com.

Cover image of Elizabeth Anderson's book, Private Government.

Dr. Anderson is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, and the John Dewey Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. Dr. Anderson’s research focuses on democratic theory, equality in political philosophy and American law, racial integration, and the ethical limits of markets. She writes about the philosophies of John Stuart Mill and John Dewey as well as the philosophy of science. She also designed and was the first Director of the Program in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at the University of Michigan. She published the 2011 book, The Imperative of Integration, which came up in our episode with Dr. Nussbaum a few weeks ago. Liz’s new book, Private Government, is based on her Tanner Lectures delivered at Princeton University. 

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 


(1 hr 9 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Adam Smith, The Theory of Moral Sentiments and The Wealth of Nations.
  2. Liz Klimas, “Woman Sues Company for Refusing to Let Her Go to the Bathroom,” The Blaze, March 4, 2013.

 

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Dr. Anderson proposed the following question in this episode, for which we invite your feedback: “If you’re a wage worker, how would you like the governance of the workplace to be reformed? What would you like to see? Would you like some say in leadership? Would you like to see constitutional rights in the governance of the workplace?

What do you think?

Let us know!  TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

039: Ep35 – BC5 – 10,000 Downloads Celebration & Giveaway!

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

This thirty-fifth episode, a short breadcrumb, is being released early to announce the fact that Philosophy Bakes Bread has reached the exciting early milestone of 10,000 episode downloads! We also wanted to put this out early, given that we’re setting a deadline to enter our celebration give-away: October 1st, 2017! Listen to this breadcrumb or read the transcript here below for more information about how to enter!

Photo of sparklers and fireworks as a symbol of celebration! Creative Commons License, Freestock.org, December 2016.

Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

(6 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Transcript with Info on How to Enter the Giveaway

(more…)

033: Ep29 – What’s the Public Got to Do with It?

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this twenty-ninth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Drs. Amanda Fulford and Naomi Hodgson, on the topics of “What is the public?” and understanding philosophy as education – sung in a Tina Turner voice: “What’s the Public Got to Do with It, Got to Do with It?”

Photo of Drs. Naomi Hodgson (left) and Amanda Fulford (right) at the 2017 Public Philosophy Journal's Collaborative Writing Workshop.

Photo courtsey of Dr. Christopher P. Long, taken at the Public Philosophy Journal’s 2017 Collaborative Writing Workshop in Hickory Corners, Michigan.

Dr. Fulford is Reader in the Philosophy of Education at Leeds Trinity University in Leeds, in the United Kingdom. Her work is informed by thinkers including Stanley Cavell and his readings of the 19th century essayists Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson. Dr. Naomi Hodgson is Lecturer in Education Studies at Liverpool Hope University, also in the U.K., where she teaches the philosophy of education. Her work is focused on the relationship between education, government, and subjectivity.  She is author of Citizenship for the Learning Society (Wiley, 2016) and she coauthored Philosophy and Theory in Educational Research with Amanda, releasing that book also in 2016, with Routledge Press.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 


(1 hr 8 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. The Cross Examined Life podcast.
  2. Stanley Cavell, The Senses of Walden (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992).

 

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Drs. Hodgson and Fulford proposed the following questions in this episode, for which we invite your feedback:

  1. If some things about you changed, your hair, a tattoo, a lost limb, are you still the same person?”
  2. “If some new people move to town, is your community the same community as it was before they came to town?”
  3. What is philosophy for?”

What do you think?

Let us know!  TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below.

032: Ep28 – Philosophy in Nature

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this twenty-eighth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Andrea Christelle, co-founder of the Sedona Philosophy Experience, on the topic of “philosophy in nature.”

Dr. Andrea Christelle.

According to their Web site, the Sedona Philosophy Experience “was conceived by four university professors who had the crazy idea to bring their love of philosophy and nature to the hiking public in a completely new way. SPEX offers philosopher-led hikes, tours, and retreats among the majestic red rocks of Sedona. Participants are encouraged to discuss and compare opinions on life’s big questions. We are not here to tell you what to think but to stimulate conversation and thought. No experience is necessary–just a natural curiosity about the wonders of life.”

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

(1 hr)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.

Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. John Stuart Mill, On Liberty, free online here.
  2. Plato’s Apology, free online here.
  3. Northern Arizona University’s Philosophy in the Public Interest program.
  4. The Sedona Philosophy Experience. Here’s SPEX’s YouTube channel.

 

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Dr. Christelle proposed the following questions in this episode, for which we invite your feedback: “How can philosophy help us to restore a healthy democracy in the United States?”

What do you think?

Let us know!  TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below!

030: Ep26 – BC5 – Thanks and an Outtake

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

This twenty-sixth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special “breadcrumb” episode with Dr. Annie Davis Weber, who was featured in Episode 25. We have some thanks to give for listener feedback and we had a big laugh after recording an episode, about a line that ended up in the episode with Annie.

A sign symbolizing three methods of communication, three ways, as a gag to connect with an outtake from episode 25, in which Dr. Cashio refers to '3-way communication.' The tag in the photo reads: 'Three-way communication? Our first outtake on Philosophy Bakes Bread.'

Thanks for feedback from Thomas O’Connor for his tweet, as well as one from Marnie Hughes Warrington!

As always, you can reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

(7 mins)

 

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.
Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. This breadcrumb was recorded at the conclusion of our interview with Dr. Annie Davis Weber, for Episode 25 of the show.

 

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Annie proposed the following question in episode 25, for which we continue to invite your feedback: “How do you know if a university is any good?” What do you say?

Let us know!  TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below!

029: Ep25 – Assessing Assessment

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Annie Davis WeberIn this twenty-fifth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Annie Davis Weber of the University of Kentucky on “Assessing Assessment: The Philosophy Behind Measuring Student Success in Higher Education.”

A scantron form.

Dr. Annie Davis Weber is Assistant Provost for Strategic Planning and Institutional Effectiveness at the University of Kentucky. She earned her Ed.D. in Higher Education Leadership and Policy at Vanderbilt University. In 2015, she was honored to have been named a Fellow of the Society of College and University Planners (SCUP).

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

(62 mins)

 

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.
Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Buddhist philosophy mentioned in the show is exemplified in Thich Nhat Hanh, The Heart of the Buddha’s Teaching: Transforming Suffering into Peace, Joy, and Liberation (New York: Broadway Books, 1999).
  2. Collegiate Learning Assessment.
  3. Richard Arum and Josipa Roska, Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011).
  4. A bottle of Chivas Regal whiskey.We mention Chivas Regal on the show, in connection with the Chiva Regal effect. When something costs more, people often think it’s better, so some schools raise their prices in order to improve the appearance of their institution. Philosophy Bakes Bread is not sponsored by Chivas Regal… yet. Here’s their Web site. Dr. Cashio says that it’s brandy. Chivas Regal calls their product “whisky.” Whether you drink or you don’t, behave responsibly, folks, or we’ll send the assessment assessors to assess you.

 

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Annie proposed the following question in this episode, for which we invite your feedback: “How do you know if a university is any good?” What do you say?

Let us know!  TwitterFacebookEmail, or by commenting here below!

028: Ep24 – BC4 – Teaching Kids about Pessimism

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

This twenty-fourth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is another “breadcrumb” with Dr. Mariana Alessandri of the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. In this breadcrumb, we talk about how to talk to our kids about the little engine that couldn’t, or quixotic pessimism, the focus of our full-length episode 22.

A book cover for 'The Little Engine that Could,' which reads 'The Little Engine that Just Couldn't Even.'

Episode 22 of the show was titled “The Little Engine that Couldn’t.” If you haven’t heard it yet, check it out and don’t miss episode 23, breadcrumb 3, our first of two breadcrumbs with Dr. Alessandri, on the bread-baking metaphor. Ep23, BC3, Who Bakes Bread Anymore?

As always, you can reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

(11 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.
Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Alfie Kohn, Punished by Rewards (New York: Mariner Books, 1993).
  2. Daniel H. Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us (New York: Riverhead Books, 1995).
  3. Story in Billboard on Lynn Manuel Miranda and his hoodie sweatshirt that reads: “Rehearsal is the best part.”

 

Connect with Us!

Tell us what you think! Reach out to us and follow the show on  TwitterFacebook, by way of Email, or by commenting here below!

027: Ep23 – BC3 – Who Bakes Bread Anymore?

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

This twenty-third episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special edition of the show that we call a “breadcrumb,” featuring Dr. Mariana Alessandri. Dr. Alessandri talks with us again, in our first of two breadcrumbs with her, about the bread baking metaphor for philosophy, how apt it is, but for surprising reasons. Bread is useful, but very few people today bake it themselves.

A photo of breadcrumbs next to a cut loaf of bread.

Dr. Alessandri was with us on episode 22 of the show, “The Little Engine that Couldn’t.” If you haven’t heard it yet, listening to this one first, check them both out, as well as episode 24, out next, which is a second breadcrumb episode that we recorded as well. Ep24, BC4 – Teaching Kids about Pessimism.

As always, you can reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

 

(18 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.
Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Seneca, biography.
  2. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, biography.
  3. Jeff Hertzberg and Zoe François, Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery that Revolutionizes Home Baking (New York: Thomas Dunne Books, 2007).
  4. YouTube how-to videos Weber mentioned & watches, especially The Wood Whisperer and WoodGears. For a great, short YouTube video on bread baking, check out Hertzberg and François’s video on their bread making method.

 

 

Connect with Us!

Tell us what you think! Reach out to us and follow the show on  TwitterFacebook, by way of Email, or by commenting here below!

026: Ep22 – The Little Engine that Couldn’t

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this twenty-second episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Dr. Mariana Alessandri of the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV) on the topic of “The Little Engine that Couldn’t.” Dr. Alessandri is an assistant professor of philosophy at UTRGV. She has published in The New York TimesTimes Higher Education, as well as in academic journals. She recently published a piece related to this episode in The New York Times, titled “In Praise of Lost Causes.”

Dr. Mariana Alessandri.

This episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread is followed by not one, but two “breadcrumb” episodes. The first one is a follow-up conversation that we had on the bread-baking metaphor. The second is about what we should tell our kids if we adopt Dr. Alessandri’s quixotic pessimism as our outlook. Be sure to check those out: Ep23, BC3 – Who Bakes Bread Anymore?; Ep24, BC4 – Teaching Kids about Pessimism.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

(64 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

iTunes logo.Google PlayRSS logo feed icon and link.
Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Joshua Foa DienstagPessimism: Philosophy, Ethic, Spirit (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009).
  2. Seneca.
  3. Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote (New York: Harper Perennial,  2005).
  4. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, biography.
  5. Martin Seligman, et al., The Optimistic Child (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1995), 295-7.

 

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Mariana proposed the following question in this episode, for which we invite your feedback: “If you could somehow know that you were going to fail at something, what is still worth doing?” What do you say?

Let us know!  Twitter, Facebook, Email, or by commenting here below!