025: Ep21 – BC2 – What to Do About Wicked Problems? Voicemail and Response Breadcrumb

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Danielle Lake.This twenty-first episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast is a special edition of the show that we call a “breadcrumb.” A Breadcrumb is a short, 8-20 minute episode that was cut off from a longer show, that’s a collage of little clips, or, as in this case, that is a response to listener feedback. Today’s breadcrumb episode is a bigger version of what in the past we’ve called a “You Tell Me!” segment. We got a great voicemail from Phil in Lexington, KY, and we had Dr. Danielle Lake back on the show to respond to Phil’s great message.

A photo of breadcrumbs on a table near a loaf of bread that has been cut.

Dr. Lake was first interviewed in Episode 12 of the show, which we called “That’s a Wicked Problem You’ve Got There.” Recall that Dr. Lake is assistant professor in the department of Liberal Studies at Grand Valley State University, with her Ph.D. in Philosophy. In 2016, she was honored with the John Lachs Award for Public Philosophy from the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy. She is the author of Institutions and Process: Problems of Today, Misguided Answers from Yesterday (2008), in addition to many journal articles. 

As always, you can reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

(20 mins)

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Notes

  1. Oral History,” as defined by the Oral History Association.
  2. There have been countless examples of town hall meetings that turned into screaming matches. Here is one of many stories, and here’s another.


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024: Ep20 – Is the Cross Examined Life Worth Living?

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this twentieth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Eric Thomas Weber and Dr. Anthony Cashio interview Chris Tatem, a Clerk of Courts in Wyoming and the host of the Cross Examined Life podcast.

Logo for the Cross Examined Life podcast.

Chris has always been interested in philosophical questions. Early on, he asked his teachers and parents endless questions. At an early age, he wrote Socratic dialogues, before he went on to study under a professor who was his inspiration for that kind of writing. He continued on into work in the justice system. His undergraduate studies in Philosophy inspire him daily, he explains. His inspiration for creating the Cross Examined Life podcast stem from that love of philosophy, connected with the inspiration he gains from watching talented attorneys engage in cross examination in court rooms.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

(58 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

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Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. The Cross Examined Life podcast.
  2. C.C.W. Taylor and Mi-Kyoung Lee, “The Sophists,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, September 2011.

 

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Chris proposed the following question in this episode, for which we invite your feedback: “As you are speaking with others, are you actively listening, or are you just waiting for your turn to speak?” What do you say?

Let us know!  Twitter, Facebook, Email, or by commenting here below!

023: Ep19 – On Anger and Forgiveness

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

The cover of Dr. Nussbaum's book, Anger and Forgiveness.In this nineteenth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Anthony Cashio and Dr. Eric Thomas Weber interview Dr. Martha Nussbaum of the University of Chicago on the topic of “Anger and Forgiveness,” the subject of her recent book by that name, which is available both as a printed book and as an audio book. Dr. Nussbaum has been named one of the most influential living philosophers. She was the recipient of the 2016 Kyoto Prize, and then, in 2017, gave the Jefferson Lecture, the highest honor that the U.S. government can bestow in the humanities. The video of her lecture is available online here.

Dr. Martha Nussbaum.

Dr. Nussbaum has written many books and is known especially for the “capabilities approach” to human development, such as in her 2000 book, Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach, and later in Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership (2006), as well as Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach, released in 2011. Dr. Nussbaum is also known for her work on emotions, such as in Political Emotions: Why Love Matters for Justice, as well as for her work on higher education, as in Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

(1 hr 1 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

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We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. The 2016 Kyoto Prize, awarded to Dr. Martha Nussbaum: https://news.uchicago.edu/article/2016/06/17/prof-martha-nussbaum-wins-kyoto-prize.
  2. Dr. Nussbaum’s 2017 Jefferson Lecture: https://www.neh.gov/about/awards/jefferson-lecture/martha-nussbaum-jefferson-lecture, written. A video of the lecture is available here: https://www.neh.gov/content/2017-lecture-video.
  3. Biographical information about Dr. Nussbaum in Emotion Researcher: http://emotionresearcher.com/on-anger-disgust-love/.
  4. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on Epicurus: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/epicurus/.
  5. Plato, Meno, referred to in relation to the slave boy who is invited into the conversation in the dialogue. Available online here: http://classics.mit.edu/Plato/meno.html.
  6. Dr. Nussbaum’s John Locke Lectures: http://www.philosophy.ox.ac.uk/john-locke-lectures#collapse1-3.
  7. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on Śāntideva: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/shantideva/.
  8. Elizabeth Anderson, The Imperative of Integration (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013).
  9. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on “The Capability Approach.”

 

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Dr. Nussbaum proposed the following question in this episode, for which we invite your feedback: “What are the emotions that are driving the unrest and panic that we see, on the Left and on the Right? What’s that all about and how can we address it?” What do you say?

Let us know!  Twitter, Facebook, Email, or by commenting here below!

 

022: Ep18 – Creating Community through Dialogue

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

Dr. Chris Long.In this eighteenth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Anthony Cashio and Dr. Eric Thomas Weber interview Dr. Chris Long of Michigan State University on the topic of “Creating Community through Dialogue.” Chris is a co-founder of The Public Philosophy Journal and is Dean of the College of Arts and Letters at Michigan State.

A group of people talking and writing together at the Public Philosophy Journal's 2017 Collaborative Writing Workshop, near South Gull Lake in Michigan.

Photo by Chris Long, 2017.

Logo of the Public Philosophy Journal.Dr. Long’s research has focused on Ancient Greek and Contemporary Continental Philosophy, as in his three books: The Ethics of Ontology: Rethinking an Aristotelian Legacy (SUNY 2004), Aristotle On the Nature of Truth (Cambridge 2010), and an enhanced digital book entitled, Socratic and Platonic Political Philosophy: Practicing a Politics of Reading (Cambridge 2014). The digital platform of the enhanced digital book enables readers to engage directly with the author in an online community.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

(1 hr 4 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

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Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. The Public Philosophy Journal’s Web site. Here is an 2015 account of the project.
  2. Information about Dr. Long’s role as Dean of the College of Arts and Letters at Michigan State University.
  3. Chris Long, Reiner Schürmann and the Poetics of Politics (forthcoming, Punctum Books). See also Long’s essay, linked to from his Web site: Chris Long, “Reiner Schürmann: Care of Death,” Philosophy Today 2016 (print) / 2017 (online).

 

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Dr. Long proposed the following question in this episode, for which we invite your feedback: “How will you, through living your life intentionally, contribute to enriching the world?” What do you say?

Let us know!  Twitter, Facebook, Email, or by commenting here below!

Call for Proposals for SOPHIA Panels in 2018

The logo for WRFL Lexington, 88.1 FM.The Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA) welcomes proposals for a variety of conferences in 2018. In accordance with our mission, we especially encourage topics of contemporary and public concern, as well as engagement with scholars in other fields or with communities beyond the academy. Select panels and panelists may be featured on SOPHIA’s Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, which airs on WRFL Lexington, 88.1 FM.

In case it is desired, you can download a printable, Adobe PDF version of this call for proposals here.

This is an image of the top of the printable, Adobe PDF version of this call for proposals.

Interested persons can either submit a proposal for a panel at one of the following conferences, or they may individually submit to SOPHIA with the intent of joining with other SOPHIA presenters on a panel to be developed. Note that individual papers can often be submitted directly to a larger conference, but some events, such as SAAP’s, specify that “multiple submissions will not be accepted and that persons participating in invited sessions may not submit to the regular program.”

Dr. Daniel Brunson.All submissions should be prepared for anonymous review, and be accompanied by a second document with contact information for each presenter. Please email your submission to danieljamesbrunson@gmail.com by 11:59 PM ET for each deadline below.

 

Logo of the APA Eastern Division.1: American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division, 01/03/18 – 01/06/18 in Savannah, GA,

Proposal Submission Deadline is Monday, July 3rd. Individual Papers or Presentations: An Abstract of 300-500 words; Panels: An Abstract of 600-1200 words, with titles.

 

2: Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, 03/08-03/10 in Indianapolis, IN. Proposal

Submission Deadline is Monday, August 28th. Individual Papers or Presentations: 600 word abstract; Panels: A panel abstract of 450-600 word and at least 600 word abstracts per paper. For the SAAP event, our invitation is open, yet we encourage contributions that address the conference theme, “Ethos and Creativity.” The theme comes from a philosophically significant essay about the host city, Indianapolis, written by Indianapolis poet Mari Evans (1923–2017) about race and artistic practice.

 

The Logo of the Public Philosophy Network.3: 4th Conference of Public Philosophy Network, 02/8/18 – 02/10/18 in Denton, TX

Proposal Submission Deadline is Monday, September 11th. Individual Papers or Presentations: An Abstract of 300-500 words; Panels: An Abstract of 600-1200 words, with titles. The 2017 conference theme is philosophizing impact: What philosophical practices improve the uptake of philosophy, both across the disciplines, and throughout society?

 

Logo of the Central Division of the American Philosophical Association.4: American Philosophical Association, Central Division, 02/21/18 – 02/24/18 in Chicago, IL, Proposal

Submission Deadline is Monday, September 23rd. Individual Papers or Presentations: An Abstract of 300-500 words; Panels: An Abstract of 600-1200 words, with titles.

 

If you are interested in proposing a paper or a panel for an event not listed here, contact Dr. Brunson at the email address above. For more information about SOPHIA, visit our About page, “like” our Facebook page, and “follow” us on Twitter.

021: Ep17 – The Wisdom in Humor

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

In this seventeenth episode of the Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast, co-hosts Dr. Anthony Cashio and Dr. Eric Thomas Weber interview the New York Times Best-selling authors of Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar, Tom Cathcart and Daniel Klein.

Tom Cathcart's and Daniel Klein's heads surrounding philosophy books and joke books.

Danny Klein has written comedy for Lily Tomlin, Flip Wilson, and others, and published scores of fiction and non-fiction books—from thrillers to entertaining philosophical books, such as his London Times bestseller, Travels with Epicurus, and his most recent book, Every Time I Find the Meaning of Life They Change It.

Tom studied theology and managed health care organizations before linking up with Danny to write Plato and a Platypus, Aristotle and an Aardvark, and the Heidegger and a Hippo books. Tom is also the author of The Trolley Problem, or Would You Throw the Fat Guy Off the Bridge? an entertaining philosophical look at a tricky ethical conundrum.

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

(1 hr 10 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

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Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Epicurus and Epicurean Philosophy on the Web.
  2. Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot (New York: Grove Press, 1954).

 

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, Tom and Danny proposed the following question in this episode, for which we invite your feedback: “Why are there things that are, rather than nothing?” What do you think?

Let us know!  Twitter, Facebook, Email, or by commenting here below!

 

State-Sponsored Hacktivism and “Soft War”

Civil American, Volume 2, Article 2 (May 25, 2017), https://goo.gl/R55J4V.

| By George R. Lucas |

A Moral and Legal Challenge in the Cyber Domain |

Skeptics (e.g., Thomas Rid, 2013) have cast doubt on the notion of authentic cyber warfare.  Cyber conflict consists, the skeptics argue, solely of activities which fall well short of full scale warfare:  e.g., crime, vandalism, “hacktivism” (political activism by individuals and organizations carried out in the cyber domain), industrial espionage, and military espionage. Talk of cyber “warfare,” they complain, is largely conceptual confusion, coupled with misplaced metaphorical exaggeration.

U.S. Air Force Cadets learning basic cyber operations.

(U.S. Air Force Photo/Raymond McCoy)

Against such criticisms, I have argued by contrast that there is a distinctive category of cyber conflict that qualifies as warfare – or, more correctly, which rises to the level of the “use, or threat of use, of force by states; or, the equivalent of an armed attack” in international law (Lucas 2017).  This new kind of warfare has thus far manifest itself in two distinctive forms:

  1. effects-based weapons (such as Stuxnet) which can be deployed to damage or destroy military targets; and
  2. weapons and attacks in the cyber domain intended to produce political effects similar to those usually sought as the goal or objective of a conventional use of force by states against one another.

Cover of Carl Von Clausewitz's book, On War.I have labeled this second class of cyber hostilities “state-sponsored hacktivism” (SSH).  SSH is one of the principle tactics of a wider phenomenon, recently dubbed “soft war,” or unarmed conflict (Gross & Meisels, 2017) [Note]. It qualifies as warfare because it is deployed to compel an adversary to yield to the political aims of the state utilizing it.  SSH is perfectly capable of achieving the equivalent of occupying an enemy’s cities, destroying his army, and breaking his will to fight.  It is fully capable of moving a political center of gravity from a given posture prior to the attack, to one more in keeping with the attacker’s own political aspirations vis á vis the victim’s in the aftermath.  In short, this form of cyber conflict satisfies the classical definition of Clausewitz (1830) regarding war as politics carried out by alternative means.

SSH is not identical to, nor can it be merely reduced to acts of vandalism, crime, or espionage, although it utilizes such components within the framework of an SSH attack.  One might say that SSH is either none of the above, or else it involves all of the above “on steroids.”  Considerations of scale and magnitude, as well as of ease of access, are important in understanding this category of warfare, much as such considerations have been, in the past, for differentiating between “private” and domestic uses of conventional lethal force (e.g., as criminal acts by individuals or organizations), and those of “public” warfare that are state-sponsored. (more…)

SOPHIA Trustee Dr Jackie Kegley Featured in CSU Profile

California State University has recently released a great profile of SOPHIA Trustee Dr. Jackie Kegley in its “Impact of the CSU” online newsletter. Jackie has been an influential leader at CSU Bakersfield for 48 years, on top of her immeasurable influence on SOPHIA.

Dr. Jackie Kegley.

Check out this great profile of Jackie and the impact she has had on a generation of students and her institution. She serves as an inspiration for many first-generation college students, furthermore, at an institution that teaches a high percentage of such students. She was the first in her family to earn a bachelor’s degree, and she kindly came on SOPHIA’s radio show and podcast, Philosophy Bakes Bread, to talk about teaching philosophy to first-gen students in episode 15.

020: Ep16 – On Disability & American Philosophy

Philosophy Bakes Bread radio show and podcast

This sixteenth episode of Philosophy Bakes Bread aired on WRFL Lexington, 88.1 FM, on Monday, April 17th of 2017, and was a special episode on the subject of disability and American philosophy. It was another special episode recorded on location at a conference, except for Eric Weber, who skyped in from a closet in Ohio. This episode features four guests who were all on a panel at the annual gathering of the 2017 Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy in Birmingham, AL.

Person in a wheelchair beside an inaccessible curb, that drops off down to the road.

Our guests included:

Dr. Justin BellDr. Justin Bell, a.k.a. “Papa J.B.,” of the University of Houston Victoria;

 

Dr. Daniel Brunson.Friend of the show and returning guest, Dr. Daniel Brunson of Morgan State University, who was featured also in Episode 6, on philosophy for first-generation college students;

Dr. Nate JacksonDr. Nate Jackson. of Capital University;

 

Dr. Sarah WoolwineDr. Sarah Woolwine. of the University of Central Oklahoma;

 

Listen for our “You Tell Me!” questions and for some jokes in one of our concluding segments, called “Philosophunnies.” Reach out to us on Facebook @PhilosophyBakesBread and on Twitter @PhilosophyBB; email us at philosophybakesbread@gmail.com; or call and record a voicemail that we play on the show, at 859.257.1849. Philosophy Bakes Bread is a production of the Society of Philosophers in America (SOPHIA). Check us out online at PhilosophyBakesBread.com and check out SOPHIA at PhilosophersInAmerica.com.

 

 

(56 mins)

Click here for a list of all the episodes of Philosophy Bakes Bread.

 

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Subscribe to the podcast! 

We’re on iTunes and Google Play, and we’ve got a regular RSS feed too!

 

Notes

  1. Victor Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning (New York: Beacon Press, 2006).
  2. Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five (New York: Modern Library, 1999).
  3. Soren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling (New York: Penguin Classics, 1986).
  4. Soren Kierkegaard, Sickness Unto Death (New York: Penguin Classics, 1989).

 

You Tell Me!

For our future “You Tell Me!” segments, our guests proposed an excellent question for you, the listener. We’d love to know what you think about it! Here’s the question: “How are you disabled? What does that mean about your vision of the good life?”

What do you think?

Let us know!  Twitter, Facebook, Email, or by commenting here below!

 

Transcript Available

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